“Seismic” Events in IT Services


Who Knows What You Do? by Justin Crotty
September 15, 2009, 4:03 pm
Filed under: Ingram Micro, marketing | Tags: , ,

When you think of what it is your company does, who do you think could explain it well?  Here’s a newsflash: Probably not your employees.

I’ve been saying this for years – and sometimes sound like a broken record – but our challenges with marketing and selling our value in the IT channel really start with being able to explain a simple value proposition to our customers. 

Do this simple experiment.  Setup a video camera on a tripod in a conference room at your office.  Without warning, invite each of your employees into the room, one at a time, and ask them to give you the 15 second elevator pitch about what it is your company does.  Once you have captured each employee’s pitch, compare them.

What you will find will trouble you.

Now, it’s not that your employees are intentionally misrepresenting your company nor are they poor elevator pitchmen.  It is simply the wide variation of responses you receive that will define the problem your customers are having, or your prospects will have, when trying to understand what you do for them.

If your employees, who work inside your company every day, have such a disparate view of your company, what are they telling your customers?  Imagine the disparate messages your customers are receiving?

It falls to management to define your company’s value proposition and ensure each of your employees is able to understand and communicate it properly.  The simple exercise of defining your value proposition and solidifying the standard company elevator pitch will help both your customers, as well as your employees, understand what value you bring to them.  Ultimately, it may help you win new customers and shorten your sales cycles.

Nevertheless, you don’t have to tackle this alone. Ingram Micro has helped hundreds of solution providers tackle this very issue – with outstanding success.



The Top Four Things Your MSP Doesn’t Want You To Know by Justin Crotty

There is widespread agreement that managed services is an IT service delivery model that is here to stay.  As with any other relatively new market, the SMB managed service space is highly fragmented with hundreds of existing application and service vendors and just as many new entrants to the industry competing for solution providers’ mind-and- market share.

A decade ago during the boom and bust of the dot com era, a similar landscape presented itself to IT solution providers.  Many businesses made emotional or hurried decisions when it came to vendor and partner selection.  Some businesses were swept away by fancy marketing, messaging, and branding campaigns by new entrants and fly-by-night dot-com companies.  The results of many of those decisions are well documented.

The same caution and logic must be applied in todays highly fragmented, early stage managed services market.  Many MSP’s, application providers, and service providers may not be what they appear or what their websites, blogs, and press releases claim.  Because most of these early stage companies are privately held, it is hard to get detailed information about them to help you make buying decisions and partnership selections.  Future success, stability, longevity, and financial solvency for these small players and new entrants may be challenging or downright bleak – and their management teams know it. 

Here are four things those management teams may not want you to know about their operations:

4.  I Run My Company with 3 People Out of a Van Down by The River

Small is no indictment of quality or financial stability.  However, it pays to be diligent when making MSP provider or partnership selections.  Does the potential provider or partner have a sustainable business model?  Can they demonstrate financial solvency?  Are they capitalized appropriately to grow as you grow?  Can they support your needs long-term?  Look under the hood and ask questions about how their business is built.  If they refuse to answer your questions or provide vague answers, steer clear.  They aren’t being specific because they know you won’t like the answers.

3.  The Only Metric I Care About is My Revenue Multiple

There is certainly no crime in building a business to one day reap the rewards when you sell or merge that business.  However, when the revenue multiple is more important than product quality, good support, or solid operating methodologies, that can cause problems for clients and partners.  Again, ask some tough questions.  How is the company financed?  Who holds ownership positions – employees and owners or VC’s and private equity people?  The answers will give you some indication of the time horizon that business is operating under.  Beware of short-term thinkers and the churn-and-burn operators.  Your best interests are secondary to theirs.

2.  I’m A Solution Provider Just Like You (aka I Sell to End Users Too)

As a distributor, I get asked about selling to end-users every day by solution providers who are concerned that Ingram Micro will take their end-users direct.  Yet those same solution providers have no qualms about doing business with MSP organizations that openly sell to end-customers.  Those MSP organizations may even use the fact that they have end-user sales experience as a selling point in their messaging to attract solution providers as customers.  If your partners and suppliers sell to end-users, they pose a potential competitive problem for you.  Proceed with caution.

1.  I Offer You Little Long-Term Value as a Partner

Do your homework.  Look for substance beyond the bootcamp, blog, or white paper.  Separate the spin from the reality.  What does the potential partner offer you in terms of competitive advantage, long-term defendable value, or scale?  How do they make your company better?  How do they make you look bigger?  How do they augment your capabilities?  What can they help you achieve that you cannot achieve on your own or with anyone else?  What is unique, lasting, or significant about their value proposition to you?

These are uncharted waters.  Don’t navigate them alone.  Call us to talk shop and help you make the difficult decisions critical to your success.  www.ingrammicro.com/seismic



The Value IS The Service by Justin Crotty

Also published on MSPmentor.net on  February 18, 2009 as monthly guest column contribution.

 

Generally speaking, IT managed service providers are technologists, both in training and previous professional pursuits.  The managed services market is also highly fragmented, with a long list of small technology and software companies all battling for the attention and business of end users and IT service providers.  The value focus in all of the selling and marketing efforts has resulted in a disturbing trend carried over from the hardware selling models: A focus on tools, technology, and features/functions.

 

Avoid this trap at all costs.

 

Here’s a newsflash: Only technology providers get excited about technology.  The rest of the world just wants their IT problems handled so they can conduct whatever business they are in.

 

It is critical for successful managed service providers to stay above this fray and avoid the “speeds and feeds” trap that is so prevalent in IT marketing and solution selling.  Tools are exactly that – pieces and parts of the overall finished service.  Tools and technologies are not the services you are selling, nor are they the value you provide to your clients. 

 

Your unique expertise and ability to deliver complex solutions to your clients, when added to the tools and technologies, is the service you deliver, and it is that expertise and unique value proposition you need to focus on when marketing and selling your capabilities.

 

Without question, the tools and applications you choose need to work and fit your business.  Solid tools and strong technology is the foundation for any competent and quality service you deliver.  However, too many MSP’s are focusing on and marketing the parts of their overall solution.  For example, the reason an end client should choose you to provide IT systems management and support has nothing to do with the tools you use to deliver that capability.  The assumption by the end user is that you can provide such a service – what do they care which PSA you have selected to run your business on?  Yet many MSP’s still weave vendor literature and brands into their managed services marketing and selling materials and ignore the larger question:  Why you over anybody else?

 

Don’t believe me?  Who made the transmission in your car?  Are you sure?  Do you care?  You want your car engine to perform, but you don’t really care who made the various parts, so long as the auto manufacturer stands behind the product, right?  You are buying BMW, or Toyota, or Honda, or Nissan.  You are buying the value proposition and brand promise that those various auto makers deliver.  You are not evaluating the combined parts and components that go into those cars which are delivered or made by third parties.

 

End client prospects for IT services are evaluating their decisions in the same manner.  They are looking to your brand, your value proposition, when making their decision.  If your value proposition is on target, and you are able to differentiate your capabilities around delivering a high quality service at a fair price, the tools you use are your choice and are irrelevant to your end clients.  So long as you ensure those tools work for you, they will work for your end clients.

 

Of course, Seismic offers the widest selection of tools and capabilities in the market.  But if it’s your value proposition or brand promise you want to tune up, Ingram Micro can help provide market-leading expertise with that also.



Tough Economic Times Aren’t The Apocalypse by Justin Crotty

Though nobody can question the fact that tough economic times are upon us, there is reason for optimism.  I shook my head yesterday as the Fed “announced” we have been in a recession since last December and stocks took a major dive.  Tell us something we didn’t already know.  Amazing – the fed tells us something we’ve known for months and suddenly we lose confidence and stocks tank.  I will never understand the stock market.

But I digress.  The good news for managed service providers and other IT solution providers who are pursuing recurring revenue services and software offerings is that tough economic times give us all an opportunity to present a strong value proposition to end customers who are having a difficult time. 

Here’s how:

1) Managed delivery models reduce costs for end users to deliver quality IT management with solid SLA’s.  The ability to reduce the monthly spend for a prospect will get them to listen to you today.

2) The predictability for the end user to consume IT services in the managed form factor allows for fewer surprises and an ease of budgeting that many end users will find helpful in these times.  If I know what my spend will be each month over a contract period, I feel better about making decisions today, especially if that spend is less than what I am paying now.

3) Marketing and differentiation are more important than ever.  Solution Providers who are not focused on marketing and selling their unique value proposition are missing a key opportunity to take business.  Sell the value prop and sell your capabilities – why are you unique?  Why should the end customer work with you?  What do you bring to the table that nobody else does?  It tough economic times you can win business by demonstrating value and properly marketing it.

Focus, effort, and creating value are always key drivers of success in the IT space.  Those are still the tools to use to win business in a tough market, and tough markets present opportunities to those who take advantage of it.